NOVA University and memoQ help translation students master computer-assisted translation

  • 22 June 2018
  • by The memoQ Team
NOVA University and memoQ help translation students master computer-assisted translation

Learning about technology at university is crucial for students in translation. This is why the Academic Program helps translation students all over the world to establish their first contact with computer-assisted translation.


The Academic Program is a network of more than 250 universities spread over 5 continents. The institutions that join this program look forward to giving their students the first contact with translation technology. We at memoQ are happy to contribute to the learning experience of students because we understand the importance of mastering translation technology, and the value it has for them after they graduate from school.

Usually, students take only one course on computer-assisted translation during their studies. However, it seems unrealistic to expect them to fully grasp every functionality in a CAT tool in just one semester. As stated by Ramon Inglada, author of “Translation technology usage in university translation courses: beyond word processors” (2017): CAT tools should be used and taught throughout all the different phases of a translation degree, instead of being taught in only one separated translation technology course.

This year, memoQfest featured an exciting session by David Hardisty and Marco Neves who teach memoQ and translation technology at the NOVA University in Lisbon, Portugal. In their presentation, they explained how they started to change the traditional way of teaching in order to bring translation technology all across the study program.

We hope that this initiative by David and Marco spreads across other universities in the world, mainly because students shouldn’t graduate without knowing the tools they will need to use later on during their professional career. Just like students from graphic design master Photoshop or Illustrator before graduating, we should encourage students of translation studies to do the same with CAT tools.

Learn more about how Marco and David relied on memoQ’s Academic Program to pursue their goal. The following case study “A Change in Scope: from Training to Education in memoQ” shows how they leveraged the Academic Program to bring the learning experience in translation technology to new heights.